An MCT’s perspective on taking a Microsoft Fundamentals Exam (FAQ’s)

If you are about to take a Microsoft Fundamentals exam, or are thinking of taking one in the future, it is perfectly natural to ask questions pertaining to that exam such as 'What is a Microsoft Fundamentals exam actually like?' 'How many questions are there?' 'What can I do to prepare to give myself the best opportunity to pass?' Having taught both the Azure (AZ-900TO1A) and Microsoft 365 (MS-900TO1A) courses several times this year across the UK and Ireland, it may come as little surprise that I get these questions a lot. I am always happy to answer them. I am a firm believer that if we can understand these exams and what we are facing, we are better prepared to go in and give our best performance without any surprises which may negatively impact the end result. This is a collection of FAQ's from those deliveries which I hope can help you go on to achieve the result you need

Teams: Leveraging Microsoft Teams for Microsoft Official Courseware (MOC) Delivery

In August 2018 I became a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT). I had just passed MCSA Office 365 and having been a secondary school teacher (QTS) prior to IT (a Geography Teacher no less) it was a fantastic opportunity to dive head first back into the field. From a personal perspective, I don't think there has ever been a better time to be a learner. With so much uncertainty in the job market and in such a competitive market (at least, here in the UK) it is really important to get certified for both job security and career prospects. With Microsoft overhauling certifications with roles as opposed to products it really is an exciting time to follow the path for the job you do, or the job you want to do.

Azure: Fundamentals (AZ-900) Exam Prep Guide

My experience with Azure parallels my experience of driving. Today, I am one of those who absolutely loves it; I'm out on the road every single day and now I can't quite understand how I actually got by before I had a set of wheels. But there was a time, and it was a long time, and during that time I had a lot of preconceptions that it wasn't for me; that maybe I was simply a person who was suited and destined to public transport as a passenger. So explaining all this to my wife she told me to get over myself and get on with it. That's what I really needed all along. And so it was with Azure - as someone who had spent many years in what is now termed Modern Workplace with Office 365 and Microsoft 365, I had to deconstruct all those preconceptions that Azure - and I mean here aspects that aren't Azure AD, Intune etc - wasn't for me. In the end it was force of habit and a degree of institutionalisation having worked with a set of SaaS apps for so long.