Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Meeting Join with an ID

Written: 31/07/2022 | Updated: N/A

There are many ways that we can join meetings in Teams. We can join a scheduled Teams meeting straight out of the Calendar App. We can join it via the calendar booking in Outlook which many of us tend to do. We can join a channel meeting one-click in the channel itself or we can even generate a join link for an ad-hoc meeting or get the link right off of the meeting card again in the calendar app. The latest way? We can now join scheduled and channel meetings using a Meeting ID and passcode. Now, there isn’t a great deal to go through here, and whilst ID and passcode sounds like it should be for security, it is only another alternative way to join a meeting. Meeting security is enforced by things like the lobby, and roles, and settings not this latest functionality, and there may be some which see it as a concern given it cannot – at the time of writing – be disabled. However, it may serve in situations such as providing 100 people with access to the meeting without adding 100 to the meeting invite, or spinning it up on SharePoint. Imagine having a kind of ‘personal’ meeting room for yourself with a defined meeting ID and Passcode.

Let’s go

This blog will cover

  • Generating the Meeting ID and Code
  • Using the Meeting ID and Code
  • FAQ

Pre-requisites

  • Teams Licence (within a Office/Microsoft 365 Licence)

GENERATING THE MEETING ID AND CODE
Let’s generate the Meeting ID and Code through creating a meeting

1.) In the Teams Desktop or Web Client select the Calendar App on the left app rail

2.) Select a space on the calendar or select New Meeting

3.) Create the meeting. In this example, I am going to create a meeting for 1 hour just for me and my co-presenter Vesku, and not invite anyone else to the meeting. Once done select Send

4.) The meeting is now booked. Double click on the Meeting and open it

5.) The Meeting ID and Passcode is in the join instructions (Highlighted)

6.) These can now be sent in a meeting booking in Outlook, or spun up on a SharePoint Site

7.) The Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode can also be generated using Outlook – the desktop or web version

USING THE MEETING ID AND CODE
Having now generated, or receiving a Meeting ID and Passcode, we can now use them to access the meeting at the required time

1.) In the Teams Desktop or Web Client select the Calendar App on the left app rail

2.) Select Join with an ID

3.) Enter the Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode and select Join Meeting

4.) The Meeting Pre-join screen is launched. Once configured select Join Now

5.) Our job here is done. Into the Meeting

FAQ

Q. Can we join channel meetings with a Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode?
A. Yes as shown here the Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode is generated on a channel meeting (this is in the Azure AD Team General Channel). However, the Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode need to be used in the Calendar App

Q. Can we join adhoc meetings with a Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode?
A. Yes, in a Meet Now scenario, enter the meeting, select More Options (…) then Meeting Info and you can get the Meeting ID and Meeting Passcode there. In fact, even after ending the ad-hoc meeting the Meeting ID and Passcode can still be used to open the meeting back up

Q. Can the Meeting ID or Meeting Passcode be changed?
A. It doesn’t look like it at the time of writing, the Meeting ID and Passcode is unique to that particular meeting and cannot be modified. Therefore, it is recommended to use roles and lobby in case the details are widely distributed, or the details are put up in a compromising place such as a public message board or site such as reddit

Q. What happens when you try to use a Meeting ID or Meeting Password where the Meeting no longer exists/has been cancelled?
A. The meeting is still potentially accessible for a period even when the meeting has been cancelled/deleted so it is important to ensure that the lobby is on. However, after a while the meeting does become inaccessible if accessed outside the tenant. This section is a little unclear from the testing undertaken so it would benefit from more testing by others to exactly lock the behaviors

Q. Can this functionality be disabled by PowerShell?
A. Not at the time of writing, there is nothing in the Meeting Policy either in the TAC or in PowerShell which can currently disable the functionality