Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Let’s get 100% on Teams Items in Microsoft 365 Secure Score

Last week I was in a bit of a funk. I just couldn't think of something to write about Teams. I mean, sure, at this point I've pretty much been writing about Teams weekly for over two years so it's probably not a surprise that the well runs dry occasionally. But there's also times where subject matter for blogs simply spring out of thin air. This was one. I was doing something like making my son's sandwich in the kitchen for lunch last Monday and there it was. You see the thing about me is I don't plan blogs. I don't have a list or an excel on my machine indexing what I am going to write about over the course of next few months. I'm much more clandestine and transactional. Basically I sit down and make something up on the spot, or if my memory is working as it should be take something I have thought about during the week and go with that. Sometimes it's easy. Sometimes I absolutely stitch myself up if the subject matter ends up being long. Overall? It kind of works out. So this week the thought was on Teams items in Secure Score. Secure Score is concerned with the measurement of an organization's security posture; a higher number indicating more improvement actions taken. In other words, the higher score you get, the more secure you should be through actions you have taken in your Microsoft 365 tenant such as enabling MFA or disabling legacy auth. Some people love it and see it as a great assessment tool which provides quantifiable measurements which can be used for continuous improvement and managed services. The more skeptical amongst us have viewed it as a way to work up the SKU's especially in the early days when you couldn't reach high scores without purchasing things like E5 or Azure AD P2 licences. Throughout 2021 (I had to look this up to confirm the dates), Teams was added as a new category in Secure Score and 6 items fell into this category. 1 in January, and 5 recently in July. All are to do with securing meetings. Let's go take a look at these six and how to implement each of them. Let's go get you 100% on Teams items in Secure Score. The completionist in me is looking forward to this one

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Using Sensitivity Labels to regulate the privacy and guest access of a Team

We have previously explored the implementation of DLP and Supervision policies to the Team. We will now look at applying Sensitivity Labels - currently in Public Preview. By definition, Sensitively Labels allow Teams admins to regulate access to sensitive organizational content created during collaboration within teams. In other words, it can keep Teams private (removing the ability to be set as public) and block Guests from being added. The best thing is that labels can be set at a tenant label and easily applied when creating the Team. It gives administrators so much more control over the Team in terms that users cannot simply join the Team and Owners cannot simply add guests which are not authorised to access it's content. It's another layer of protection which should be added in any Teams roll-out. It's also an answer for blocking guest access on a Team by Team basis: this works well if the creation of Teams are regulated.

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Applying Data Loss Prevention (DLP) to Chat, Channel Messages and Files

Data Loss Prevention (DLP) is a strategy for ensuring that team members do not send sensitive or critical information outside of the corporate network or to other team members. This could include financial information, personally identifiable information (PII) such as credit card numbers or information pertaining to Intellectual Property (IP) such as the design for a new application. It could even be extended to use cases such as barring profanity to be used in communications. Whilst Teams is a powerful application for users to be able to communicate and collaborate with guests and with other users in other Teams tenants, organisations also need to protect themselves against data leakage and the infringement of compliance regulations such as GDPR. Applying a DLP Policy to Teams is an essential step in any Teams deployment

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Setting up Supervision Policies for the Team

Supervision policies in Microsoft 365 are defined as capturing employee communications for examination by designated reviewers (docs.com). In layman's this means policies can be set up for someone to review team members communications who may be disclosing sensitive information or violating HR policy in the use of profanity, racial slurs, taunts or sexually explicit language in Teams channels and private messages.

Microsoft 365: Security Administration (MS-500) Exam Prep Guide

I must admit I enjoyed the security administration exam. I enjoyed studying for it. In fact, I congratulate Microsoft for introducing a Security certification which is so much more than a fundamentals exam (98-367).