Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Using List Rules and Exchange to keep the Team up to date on changes

It feels good to be back on a somewhat even keel. Winter has been absolutely crazy - and after the Microsoft Teams Winter Tour and Ignite I had to take a short break to play what I call the containment game. You know the one. Batting everything out whilst simultaneously closing everything down. It's stopping that accumulation of work from getting out of control. I am happy to say that's now done. I won. It's back to business as usual. So what should we talk about first? There is a lot of things given that Ignite is now over - and if I were others maybe I would go for the latest and greatest, yet having wanted to discuss it since it's recent release and having had no bandwidth to do so I have settled on List Rules and how we can notify the Team of changes to the list. Something straightforward and doesn't take long to write home about. So Rules. Rules are defined by Microsoft as having the purpose of 'automate [ing] tasks such as sending someone a notification when data changes in the list'. In other words, they are very likely replacements for Alerts which have been around a long time and are legacy functionality stretching back to classic SPO and SPO Lists. Now, this blog won't cover every possible scenario for a rule. There's no point - it's super simple and as you go through this blog you'll see how easy it is to implement rules. What I am more interested in is notifying the team of changes rather than individuals: either in Teams or via email. What's that? This can be done by Power Automate and we could create a flow and do it that way. Absolutely. Yet this would suggest whoever is implementing it knew how to do that and had the time and inclination to do that. For me, a lot of what I hear is people want to just do things there, on the List. So Rules for simplicity, Power Automate for anything more

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Retention Policies on Private Channels

Ok quick one as we start the weekend. I had a scenario this week where a customer of a partner asked me 'is it possible to add retention policies to private channels in Teams' - for files in private channels, not standard channels and to do this centrally. The reason for this is that they had third party backup software which doesn't work with private channels currently. Now hands up before investigation and testing I didn't know the answer to this, and it was one of those situations your probably familiar with - considering I do this every day why hadn't I come across this previously? I know. Yet these are good opportunities to learn and to fill in the blank. So, it turns out you can, but the documentation on docs doesn't exactly make this explicit. This blog aims to do so and clarify retention policies on private channels, and in contrast to standard channels

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Catching up on the the latest YouTube videos with Power Automate, Lists and Teams

It's been a while since I wrote anything about video. I did quite a few blogs on Teams and Stream last year and even did a few sessions on how they worked together on the circuit - but with the transition to modern Stream I'm very much waiting for the new experience; when we start seeing features like the web experience, when podcasts and portals emerge. All in good time - even though in moving the TMR's over I badly need the use of trim, and I still want to talk about video. You see, I watch a lot of it. I love the medium, and so doing a few blogs on power automate and approval scenarios with Lists and Teams, I also had an idea for a new blog involving video. The idea is that I constantly struggle with time. With responsibilities for work, family and community I often miss quality content that goes by on great channels like Microsoft Mechanics. So I thought what if I could put this into a List which updates and I can work through that. Surfacing it in the Team could be quite valuable

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Forms to the Flow, to the List, to the Team and Yammer using conditions and approvals

I had a lot of fun writing the last blog on approvals. So I'd thought I would double down and use the Forms app with Flow and Lists which we can surface into Teams and then push out to Yammer by the way of conditions and approvals. I thought it would just be cool to cover a real world scenario which you could apply, customise to your needs to take parts and use them in your own flow. Rather unusually given the length and amount of apps involved I haven't got much to say - I really hope you really enjoy this one

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Opting into SharePoint/OneDrive for Business as the location for Teams Meeting Recordings

Stream is changing. If you kept up to date with Ignite then you will know that it's being re-imagined and rebuilt to integrate seamlessly with applications across the stack. One of the consequences of this change is that Teams Meeting Recordings (TMR) will - like all video - be stored within SharePoint (in the case of channel meetings) and OneDrive (in the case of non-channel or what we call private meetings). There is a lot of sense and upside to this. For example, video will now be able to be shared externally which was the Achilles heel with classic stream and which many users ended up doing anyway albeit moving the video manually. Secondly, we can now leverage Microsoft 365's security and compliance functionality such as retention