Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Hyperlinked email addresses in Lists within Teams

The speaker circuit is getting ready to go this year. My speaking schedule is already loaded for January and February and then we'll go straight into Ignite in March. It's going to be a wild one. You know, like, boom. Now two areas I love speaking about - and spoke about a lot at the back end of 2020 - is Teams and Lists. It's pretty well known I love both apps and I use them a lot. However, one issue I came across this week was that I was building a list in Teams and wanted to have a column of email addresses which I could click on and then it would begin composing an email. The use case was this - as part of my job heading up an education practice I have a number of trainers I work with, and the list serves as both a skills matrix but has the trainers contact details too. Think of this as a way I - or any other team member who uses the list - can track the trainers who work for me whilst being able to easily identify and contact one should a specific course opportunity come up. Now, I wanted to send an email straight from the list. The hyperlink column didn't work: it threw an invalid URL and there is no email column option. So how can we make this work?

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: New Calendar View in Lists Web App + Teams

One of the things I enjoy most about what I do is the maturation of the technology which I use. And so it was with great pleasure that I was playing about in Teams this week in a Ring 4 test tenant getting ready for AMS Germany when I saw that calendar view for Lists has dropped. I didn't see any announcements. Maybe it'll be on the SharePoint Pitstop next week. But why I was excited was because when Lists was first announced back at Build earlier in the year, it was confirmed it would have List, Gallery, Grid and Calendar views. Gallery was added a month or two back - it was after Lists was introduced into Teams and now we have Calendar to complete the set. You see, I have become a big advocate of Lists over the last four or five months. I have spoken about it a lot on the circuit. This is because I think it is very central to what Microsoft is doing to revitalise SharePoint and is the application which best defines Teams as a Platform (TaaP). But getting back on point, calendar view is a nice add. Use it for events. Use it for meetings. Use it for birthdays, or deadlines, or schedules. This opens up a whole new raft of use cases for how Lists can be used - both in the web app and in Teams. It can apply both to personal and team Lists

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Using List Controls to disable personal lists and List Templates

A quick one today. I was looking over the SharePoint Roadmap pitstop for October and saw that there are now two List controls available: these are the ability to disable personal lists and the ability to disable List templates. Since I am giving talks on Lists next week at no less than three events either side of the Atlantic then I thought it would be good to cover this and get ahead of the curve. The first is the ability to disable personal lists. Personal lists are your own lists, they are stored in OneDrive and when creating a List you would select 'My Lists' from the dropdown within the Web App. They are not available in Teams since Lists in Teams are a different type of Lists called Teams Lists. These are housed in SharePoint and are meant to be shared with other members of the Team. The ability to disable personal Lists can simplify, or hone, the purpose of Lists insofar that by disabling personal, you are keeping them within SharePoint, within a Team context and away from individuals. Imagine that a really important List was located in someone's OneDrive and then that user left the organisation? Secondly, moving onto the ability to disable List templates this one makes complete sense: whilst they could be found helpful, they could also be - depending the organisations perspective - a hinderance since people could be confused by them. Imagine it from an end users perspective: Are these the Lists meant to be used? Did my organisation create these templates? Administrators may wish to turn them off which could, in a sense, make it easier for those who are creating Lists to simply start from scratch, import or clone. A nice pair of adds. I look forward to more in the future!

Microsoft Lists: Reporting on shared Lists and List Items created through Teams and the Lists Web App

TeamsFest is only a few weeks away. It's coming around so fast and one of the jobs I did during the week was spin up a list in the Team so that speakers could easily access their session. It had their track, it had their time and their moderator. It felt nice putting it in as a tab. It looked good and felt good. But one of the things I was thinking about now I have started to use Lists in anger is how can get I a report on who I have shared a list with. I wrote about how to share Lists and List Items in both the web experience and Teams but now imagine the scenario that I have a few dozen lists and that I collaborate on these inside and outside the organisation. How could I tell who I shared those with? Especially after a month or two where albeit best intentions, I doubt I am keeping track. It's really important to review this from time to time both in terms of administration and security. Yet one of the things we must understand is this difference between personal lists and teams lists because lists are stored in different places - and yes, yes I know its ultimately all SharePoint, but this determines how we find our sharing reports

Teams Real Simple with Pictures: Microsoft Teams Loves Microsoft Lists Pt 2

Last week we looked at the real Fundamentals between Microsoft Teams and Microsoft Lists - how to add a List as a Tab in a Team, how to create Lists from blank, from excel, from existing lists or from the templates Microsoft provide. In addition to adding an existing list into Teams we also looked at how to quick edit, how to export a List to excel, how to delete a list and how to restore that deleted list. We are now going to dive a little deeper into the List itself and look at what more we can do